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  • Tharindu Ameresekere

Management Weekly >>> Why you do so much and your employers don't really care




A common complaint that echoes among leaders is that despite them doing their best by the employees, there is little loyalty and appreciation towards them and their leadership, which undoubtedly frustrates the managers, leaders of the modern age of management. They might leave the business when you least expect and despite your best efforts almost refuse to connect with you or share your vision for the company.


Especially given the magnitude of challenges the leaders themselves face in the new normal ruled by uncertainty, how could one solve this puzzling phenomena which I call as the “Great Disappointment”.


It could be due to multiple different reasons of which this short blog post explores three prominent ones.


1. It is not synched with their values


The CEO of a famous IT firm in New York once setup a better office facility with more areas to hangout and enjoy the work they do. He also expected better support and appreciation from his team, Instead it ended up being a wasteful experience since the employees had a culture of 9AM to 5PM work after which they would leave their offices to reach home.


2. You don’t deliver what they expect from the leader


Sometimes it is alarming to see how much leaders, managers are not aware of what the team expects from them. Sometimes it may be better direction, shielding them from bullying clients and other superiors or even better feedback and constructive criticism. But it is important to understand what your team expects from you. If the main requirement is not fulfilled, it becomes challenging.


3. Communication Breakdowns

Sometimes it could be that your employees really do value you, but they do not express it. A client of mine whom I was coaching for enhancing leadership potential, shared his views on why he thinks his employees do not care for him or don't consider him to be one of them. He said he feels like an alien. He commented on how some of his peers have their personal victories such as wins in a golf tournament celebrated, regular praises for work anniversaries being wished for on social media etc. But when I spoke to the employee they were full of praise for him, thought great of him and was glad they had a leader like him in the company. It was just a case where they did not express it openly. So a vital lesson is not to let the social media hearsay about your peers dictate your verdict on the stance your employees take about you.

Dynamics differ from team to team, organisation to organisation and leader to leader. A leader working to be “liked” probably will achieve less than one whose work is dedicated towards one purpose.


Focus on your passion and purpose and praise will surely follow in a direct and / or indirect manner.

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